Disruptive Students

We can all remember being in a class where there was the typical disruptive student. The one who made the jokes, the noises … generally the pain the … But when it comes to teaching adult students, disruption and disruptive behavior takes on a different and more subtle form. More often than not the disruption is not even malicious but can still have some negative consequences.

Students who know nothing are sometimes the best ones. Untarnished, uncorrupted … enthusiastic students who know very little about a subject are like gold. But this is not always the case.

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Are taking notes effective?

It doesn’t matter who you are. If you’ve ever been in any class that has been of any remote importance or value to you, you’ve taken notes. But are they really worth it?

More often than not when you’re in a presentation of any sort there are going to be times where you’re going to want to take notes. Why? Well the answer is pretty simple. Notes are our way of taking the most important slivers of information that we’re given and ‘recording’ a summary of that importance for later, so that we can focus more on what is happening now, refer back to the recorded details later and finally give ourselves the chance to learn things later.

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What makes a good teacher?

It’s a question that tends to get raised at all the wrong times, and not something that really gets thought about all that often, normally not until there is a problem. But when it comes to something as important as instructing within education and training of any person, whether it be school students or mature adult students, the ideal is where any student is taught by a ‘good teacher.’ But what exactly makes a good teacher?

Right or wrong this is a question that has many subjective answers. And this is a good thing. If the quality of an instructor was purely measured in hard objective indicators then there would be a convergence of instructional skills and techniques and the art (and skill) of teaching would take on a very linear, predictable pattern.

Best of all everyone would be a perfect teacher!

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Why students struggle in school

Students who struggle in school is nothing new. But there has definitely been much more attention around this subject in recent times, particularly with
@pallavisinghal_ article stating that 42% of surveyed parents reporting they have low confidence in the current schooling curriculum and 44% being unsure. This leaves only a whopping 14% of surveyed parents believing that the schooling system is ‘suitable’ and yes this is a deductive conclusion.

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5 Factors that Determine ‘How fast you can teach.’

“This training should only take about 15 minutes to deliver. It’ll be quick and pretty simple so . . . I can’t imagine it taking too long.”

This comment is something that I’ve heard a few times recently and more times than I can count over the years. It’s the same phrase that creates a little smile on my face as I now realise another capital instructional offense is about to be committed.

But seeing it happen again and again, it makes me wonder a few things—why do we tend to rush training? More appropriately why do we think that we can teach people quickly? Why do we fail so badly?

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